Farmhouse Porter

English

Cette bière a été brassée en Janvier 2017 avec des malts pale ale, crystal et chocolat, houblonnée avec des houblons Styrian Golding et fermentée avec des levures britanniques. Après la fermentation et deux semaines de garde à froid, la bière a été transférée dans des fûts de chêne de Bourgogne déjà imprégnés de microbes indigènes (Brett). Quelques mois plus tard la bière a été soutirée, embouteillée et re-fermentée en bouteilles resultant une délicieusement fruitée “Farmhouse Porter”.

Voici quelques images du brassin et des animaux de la ferme qui nous ont inspiré.

 L'eglise de Plessier de Roye vue de loin

L'eglise de Plessier de Roye vue de loin

 Brasserie vue depuis la cheminée

Brasserie vue depuis la cheminée

 Tempête: chatton né à la brasserie

Tempête: chatton né à la brasserie

 Performants dératiseurs

Performants dératiseurs

 Malt chocolat utilisé dans la recette

Malt chocolat utilisé dans la recette

 Recyclage des drèches

Recyclage des drèches

 12 heures après levurage - une belle meringue...

12 heures après levurage - une belle meringue...

  2 jours de fermentation

 2 jours de fermentation

 Elevage en fut

Elevage en fut

 Elevage

Elevage

fp.jpg
 Dispo à la brasserie ou bientôt dans les caves habituelles.    Santé de la part de Dupond et Dupont.

Dispo à la brasserie ou bientôt dans les caves habituelles.  

Santé de la part de Dupond et Dupont.

20171124_104314.jpg

Farmhouse Porter

Francais

This beer was brewed in January 2017 with pale ale, crystal and chocolate malts, hopped with Styrian Golding hops and fermented with British ale yeasts. After fermentation and a couple of weeks of conditioning the beer was laid down in some well-used Burgundian wine barrels fully inoculated with a host of 'wild' microbes. Several months later the beer was racked and bottle conditioned yielding a delicious, fruity, farmhouse porter.

Here are a few images of the brew interspersed with photos of cute farmhouse animals.

 The church of Plessier de Roye in the distance

The church of Plessier de Roye in the distance

 Chimney top view of brewery

Chimney top view of brewery

 Kitten born in a brewery

Kitten born in a brewery

 Mice cathchers par excellence

Mice cathchers par excellence

 Chocolate malt used in the grist

Chocolate malt used in the grist

 Recycling spent grains

Recycling spent grains

 12 hours after pitching yeast

12 hours after pitching yeast

  3 days into fermentation

 3 days into fermentation

 Barrel ageing

Barrel ageing

 Hen ageing

Hen ageing

fp.jpg
 Available at the brewery shop or the usual places.  Cheers from Dupond et Dupont.

Available at the brewery shop or the usual places.

Cheers from Dupond et Dupont.

20171124_104314.jpg

Colapuy Defendue - collaboration brew with Mont Saleve

Francais

In the autumn of 2016 the endlessly creative Michael Novo from La Brasserie du Mont Saleve made the journey from the mountains of Haute Savoie to the lowlands of tropical Picardy (l'Oise) for a collaboration brew.

We wanted to try a 100% Brettanomyces fermentation which neither brewery had attempted before. I had kept alive the Orval-derived Brettanomyces Bruxellensis culture that had been used in the Time and Tide brew with Grand Paris and upon tasting a glass of beer that resulted from this propagation Michael had the idea of cutting up and adding freshly harvested Colapuy apples to the glass. This variety of small red apple originally from Crimea is well adapted to the Picardy orchards and can be used in cider production. It is less popular than before due to its small size and the unreliable annual harvest. The apples are however very juicy and aromatic.

We brewed a golden ale @ 1052 original gravity (13°Plato) with pale ale, light munich and acid malts and around 15% flaked oats; hopping was fairly discreet at around 25IBUs. The primary fermentation was very long and steady and a test of patience and even faith for a British brewer! After three weeks with the gravity near 1009 the beer was chilled to leave some fermentable sugars for a slow secondary fermentation is casks with the addition of apple juice.

 Brew in motion

Brew in motion

 Brettanomyces strain used for primary fermentation. Notice the Brett polymorphism (cells are all different shapes)

Brettanomyces strain used for primary fermentation. Notice the Brett polymorphism (cells are all different shapes)

 Pulling a sample from a cask infused with the same strain

Pulling a sample from a cask infused with the same strain

 About a month later a viisit to a Picardy Cidrerie to collect freshly pressed apple juice

About a month later a viisit to a Picardy Cidrerie to collect freshly pressed apple juice

 Mashed colapuy apples left overnight before pressing to allow oxidation

Mashed colapuy apples left overnight before pressing to allow oxidation

About 75 litres of apple juice was collected and allowed to start fermenting for a few days before being split into 3 casks with the addition of the base beer. This contributed fermentable sugar as well as some indigenous microorganisms from the apples.

 Some exotic looking microbes from the (unwashed / unpasteurised) Colapuy apple juice including Kloekera yeast and perhaps some non yeast entities?

Some exotic looking microbes from the (unwashed / unpasteurised) Colapuy apple juice including Kloekera yeast and perhaps some non yeast entities?

The fermentables from the apple juice and those left over from the brewery wort were consumed over the next couple of months before a period of inactivity during the winter.. With the arrival of spring the beer reawoke for a late flurry before going silent. A final gravity reading of just under 1°Plato was judged low enough to bottle the beer without too much fear of exploding bottles. Fresh yeast + sugar was added for bottle conditioning and the beer at last ready to taste at the end of May.

The final result presents an inviting golden ale with notes of fresh apple and farmhouse cider; the apple juice and barrel ageing have lent a certain roundness to the original beer. With a bit of time in the glass the initial cidery aromas give way to a more rustic / farmhouse character from the Brett. However as is apparently the case when using Brett in a primary fermentation the wild character is not overstated.  The finish is relatively dry with a dash of spices.

Initial tastings point to an obvious pairing with the classic French desert Tarte Tatin ideally served with Madagascar vanilla ice cream.

As for the label design this was a result of a coincidental visit to Plessier de Roye by two Australian descendants of the artist Raphaël Lardeurwho made the beautiful stained glass windows in the village church in the 1930's.

The beer will be available soon either directly at the two respective breweries or from the usual cave a bières / cavistes / restaurants etc.

Cheers / Santé from Craig & Michael