Time and Tide - collaboration brew with Les Brasseurs du Grand Paris + Nick Malmquist

Francais

This beer was brewed in collaboration with Les Brasseurs du Grand Paris and the microbiologist Nick Malmquist. We brewed with a portion of dark crystal malt and roasted barley and aged hops to give a ruby colored ale with low bitterness and a fruity and nutty character from the malt and my British yeast blend. The mash included flaked oats and was conducted at a very high temperature (72°C) in order to yield a relatively difficult to ferment wort with a high finishing gravity after the primary fermentation, the idea being to leave residual sugars for the next stage - a long maturation in Burgundian red wine casks with an infusion of Brettanomyces yeast for the first few months and lactic acid bacteria for the last few. The Brett strain chosen was of the Bruxellensis species and was derived from a bottle of Orval, the famous Trappist beer that develops notes of cherries and a rustic character after several months of bottle conditioning. We thought that the aromas of red fruit from the Pinot Noir casks would blend well with the wild yeast notes and dark malt flavors. 

 

This was my first foray into 'wild' beers and it has been interesting to taste throughout the process with the additional layers of complexity added at each stage before bottling.

Most beers take a few weeks to make - this one required a bit more patience..

Here's a photographic timeline -

 November 2015 - Voyage to Burgundy to visit old friends and 

 November 2015 - Voyage to Burgundy to visit old friends and 

pick up a few casks prevouisly used for Chassagne Montrachet rouge

pick up a few casks prevouisly used for Chassagne Montrachet rouge

Merci à Mr. Yves Rodet 

Merci à Mr. Yves Rodet 

Burgundian vines in the autumn

Burgundian vines in the autumn

20th December 2015 - Anthony Baraff and Nick Malmquist during the brew inspecting some old hops (specifically chosen so as to deter the growth of undesirable bacteria but not inhibit lactic acid bacteria as a result of oxidation a alpha acids)

20th December 2015 - Anthony Baraff and Nick Malmquist during the brew inspecting some old hops (specifically chosen so as to deter the growth of undesirable bacteria but not inhibit lactic acid bacteria as a result of oxidation a alpha acids)

The thimble in place - British innovation at its finest

The thimble in place - British innovation at its finest

Adding a 'thimble' to the fermentation vessel before casting the wort much to Mr. Barraf's amusement

Adding a 'thimble' to the fermentation vessel before casting the wort much to Mr. Barraf's amusement

3 weeks later tasting the resulting beer after fermentation and conditioning.

3 weeks later tasting the resulting beer after fermentation and conditioning.

January 2016 - Anthony acquiring barrel rolling skills

January 2016 - Anthony acquiring barrel rolling skills

Nick rinsing the casks with hot water and checking for leaks..

Nick rinsing the casks with hot water and checking for leaks..

Casks filled in place with the addition of...

Casks filled in place with the addition of...

these funny looking beasties - Orval derived Brettanomyces Bruxellensis yeast isolated and cultured courtesy of Nick Malmquist in a professional lab (during his free time) - thanks Nick!    

these funny looking beasties - Orval derived Brettanomyces Bruxellensis yeast isolated and cultured courtesy of Nick Malmquist in a professional lab (during his free time) - thanks Nick!

 

 

End May - addition of Lactobacillus Brevis bacteria

End May - addition of Lactobacillus Brevis bacteria

November 2016 -  the beer was racked into a tank and bottled with the addition of fresh yeast and sugar. After a further 3 weeks  we could finally taste the carbonated beer.

November 2016 -  the beer was racked into a tank and bottled with the addition of fresh yeast and sugar. After a further 3 weeks  we could finally taste the carbonated beer.

 All that effort is worthy of a classy label!

 All that effort is worthy of a classy label!

The finished beer equates more or less with our initial vision of it -  red berry fruity notes from the Brett and the extraction of  pinot noir character and some subtle oak blend beautifully with the original clean ruby ale. One major difference  - we imagined the gravity drop in the cask would have been much more significant and given in a drier beer - in reality the Brettanomyces struggled to eat much of the very unfermentable liquid it was pitched into; perhaps another strain  would have faired better or maybe the mash temperature employed could have been lower to make the residual sugars slightly more digestible. However despite the difficulty in assimilating the remaining carbohydrates the Brett did manage to impart plenty of classic rustic and fruity character probably as a result of the metabolism of other components of the young beer. The acidity from the bacteria is present but relatively restrained in part due to the contrasting residual sweetness from the malt (the final gravity of the beer is around 3.5°Plato, higher than the 0.5° we anticipated).

Overall we're delighted with the outcome - at 4.8% ABV this is a relatively low alcohol beer full of flavor and subtle nuances. It will be interesting to see how it evolves in the bottle but is ready to drink now fresh so to speak! 

Regarding the name we chose Time and Tide from the expression 'Time and tide wait for no man', the meaning of which is that no man can slow down or prevent the passing of time or the rise and fall of the tide. We thought this was particularly apt for a beer that took this long to make and whose development was relatively difficult to control.

Look out for bottles at the usual specialty beer shops / restaurants / bars. Cheers!

 

 

Time and Tide - brassin collaborative avec Les Brasseurs du Grand Paris + Nick Malmquist

Anglais

Cette bière a été brassée avec les Brasseurs du Grand Paris et le microbiologiste Nick Malmquist.  Nous avons utilisé du malt Crystal et l’orge rôtie et des vieux houblons pour apporter une couleur rubis avec peu d’amertume, un caractère noisetté et fruité venant du malt et de mon assemblage de levures britanniques. Lors de l’empatage, nous avons inclu des flocons d’avoine à haute température (environs 72°C) résultant un moût relativement difficile à fermenter avec une densité finale assez haute, le but étant d’obtenir des sucres résiduels pour la prochaine étape – un long élevage en fût avec une infusion d’une souche de Brettanomyces durant les premiers mois puis un ajout de bactéries lactiques pour les derniers mois. Les Brettanomyces sélectionnées sont des Bruxellensis et prélevées d’une bouteille d’Orval – une célèbre trappiste qui développe des notes de cerises et un côté rustique après un conditionnement en bouteilles de plusieurs mois. Nous pensions que les arômes de fruits rouges du fût de Pinot Noir se marieraient bien avec ces notes de levures sauvages et les ajouts de malts torréfiés.

C’était mon premier essai avec avec des levures sauvages et ce fût très intéressant de déguster son évolution avant son embouteillage. La plupart des bières ne prennent que quelques semaines à effectuer – celle-ci nous a demandé un peu plus de patience...

 

Voici quelques photos retraçant la vie de Time and Tide:

Novembre 2015 – Voyage en Bourgogne chez nos amis..

Novembre 2015 – Voyage en Bourgogne chez nos amis..

où nous avons pu embarquer les fûts de Chassagne Montrachet rouge

où nous avons pu embarquer les fûts de Chassagne Montrachet rouge

Merci à notre ami de longue date: Mr Yves Rodet

Merci à notre ami de longue date: Mr Yves Rodet

20 décembre 2015- Anthony Baraff et Nick Malmquist contrôlant les vieux houblons (spécifiquement choisi pour empêcher la croissance de bactéries indésirables mais pour ne pas inhiber les bactéries lactiques en raison de l'oxydation d'acides alpha.)

20 décembre 2015- Anthony Baraff et Nick Malmquist contrôlant les vieux houblons (spécifiquement choisi pour empêcher la croissance de bactéries indésirables mais pour ne pas inhiber les bactéries lactiques en raison de l'oxydation d'acides alpha.)

Le dé est en place: une innovation so Brittish!!

Le dé est en place: une innovation so Brittish!!

Janvier 2016- Anthony s’entraîne à rouler les barriques

Janvier 2016- Anthony s’entraîne à rouler les barriques

Les fûts remplis de bière sont en place...

Les fûts remplis de bière sont en place...

Les vignes en Automne

Les vignes en Automne

Ajout d’un dé dans la cuve de fermentation avant le transfert du moût.

Ajout d’un dé dans la cuve de fermentation avant le transfert du moût.

3 semaines plus tard, nous dégustons la bière après fermentation et conditionnement.

3 semaines plus tard, nous dégustons la bière après fermentation et conditionnement.

Nick rince les fûts à l’eau chaude afin de contrôler qu’il n’y ait pas de fuites.

Nick rince les fûts à l’eau chaude afin de contrôler qu’il n’y ait pas de fuites.

 avec un ajout de ces drôles de petites bestioles- Brettanomyces Bruxellensis dérivées d’une bouteille d’Orval, isolées et cultivées avec précaution par Nick Malmquist en laboratoire professionnel (durant son temps libre) - Merci Nick.

 avec un ajout de ces drôles de petites bestioles- Brettanomyces Bruxellensis dérivées d’une bouteille d’Orval, isolées et cultivées avec précaution par Nick Malmquist en laboratoire professionnel (durant son temps libre) - Merci Nick.

Fin Mai : ajout de bactéries Lactobacillus Brevis 

Fin Mai : ajout de bactéries Lactobacillus Brevis 

Novembre 2016 - Soutirage dans une cuve pour l'ajout de sucres et levures pour la refermentation en bouteille. Trois semaines d'attentes pour pouvoir enfin gouter la bière avec les bulles

Novembre 2016 - Soutirage dans une cuve pour l'ajout de sucres et levures pour la refermentation en bouteille. Trois semaines d'attentes pour pouvoir enfin gouter la bière avec les bulles

Ca mérite une belle etiquette!

Ca mérite une belle etiquette!

Le résultat final équivaut plus ou moins à notre but initial – notes de fruits rouges provenant des Brett et de l’extraction de caractères du Pinot Noir avec quelques touches subtiles de fût de chêne se mariaient joliement avec là bière initiale. Avec une différence majeure, nous pensions que la densité aurait beaucoup plus précipité en fût résultant une bière plus sèche mais en réalité la Brett a eu des difficultés à manger le liquide pas très fermenticible. Peut-être qu’une autre souche aurait réagi différemment ou bien une plus basse température d’empatage aurait permis de rendre les sucres résiduels plus fermentescibles. Cependant, malgré ces difficultés à assimiler les sucres, les Brett ont réussi à offrir beaucoup de caractères rustiques et fruités; probablement grâce aux métabolismes des autres composants de la jeune bière. L’acidité provenant des bactéries est présente mais relativement discrète en partie dûe aux sucres résiduels provenant du malt (la gravité finale de cette bière est autour de 3.5° Plato, alors que nous anticipions 0.5°.)

Dans l'ensemble nous sommes ravis du résultat - à 4.8° c'est une bière relativement faible en alcool mais pleine de saveurs et de nuances subtils. Il sera intéressant de voir l'évolution en bouteille mais elle est prête à boire toute de suite 'fresh' pour ainsi dire

Concernant son nom, nous avons choisi Time and Tide provenant de l’expression ‘Time and tide wait for no man”, signifiant qu’aucun homme ne peut changer ou arrêter le temps qui passe ou les mouvements des marées. Ce titre est particulièrement adapté à une bière qui a pris autant de temps à son élaboration et pour laquelle son développement fût si difficile à maîtriser.

 

Pour trouver cette bière, rendez-vous comme d’habitude chez votre caviste/restaurant/bar. Cheers!


La (Saint) Jean

Francais

Since antiquity people have celebrated the summer solstice, particularly in northern Europe. (I have attended a few of these events in my native Edinburgh, usually accompanied by horizontal rain). Pagan festivals including dancing and fire were adapted by Christians and are the origins of what are now known in France as La Fête de la Saint Jean (after John the Baptist's birth). These festivals traditionally feature bonfires around which rings of people dance and sing. 

In Plessier de Roye where my brewery is situated La fête de la Saint Jean is one of the best known in the region and to help celebrate the event a festive, summery ale has been brewed and will be served on the 25th June.

The beer is stylistically close to a saison - a dry, rustic, farmhouse Belgian ale. The malt and hop grists are very simple; the real star of these beers is the yeast which in the best examples lends notes of spices and fruits and ferments very dry leaving the beer light and refreshing. Very hard water also adds a firm edge to these quenching beers.

My own take on the style, at 4.5% ABV,  is by modern standards low in alcohol but traditionally these beers were not strong as they were consumed by farm workers in large volumes.

Malt-wise French and Belgian Pilsener malt make up almost the whole charge with just a dash of wheat malt. I have used Slovenian Bobek hops for moderate bittering, flavor and aroma. As for the yeast a blend of Belgian yeasts were pitched and the temperature allowed to rise to uncomfortably high levels (for a British brewer). The attenuation was as expected very high - the final gravity of the beer is around 0.5° Plato so almost diabetic.

Bottle conditioning has been achieved by krausening with a volume of a 1 day old fermentation of the same beer - this technique adds extract and fresh healthy yeast cells for the beer to come into condition or carbonate in the bottle.

The title of the beer is appropriately La (Saint) Jean. The brackets are a reference to my wife's  late grandad, Jean, who, after a hard week's work on the farm, was known for his celebratory feasts complete with singing. He was apparently not a saint.

For those who live nearby there is an opportunity to taste the beer 'en pression' on the 25th June in Plessier de Roye. Look out for bottles in the usual places from the beginning of July.

Que canto!